An inventory of moths (Lepidoptera: Heterocera) from Kullu and Mandi districts of Himachal Pradesh

Naresh Thakur Vandna Bhardwaj Priyanka Kumari Avtar Kaur Sidhu   

Open Access   

Published:  May 25, 2024

DOI: 10.7324/JABB.2024.175339
Abstract

The current research work was done to evaluate the diversity and distribution of moths (Lepidoptera) from Kullu and Mandi districts of Himachal Pradesh. The sample of moths was collected from 4 villages in Mandi (Sadar Mandi, Joginder Nagar, Sarkaghat, and Sunder Nagar) that lie at an altitude of 750–1,200 m above the main sea level and 5 villages in Kullu (Banjar, Tandi, Chethar, Bini, and Bahu) that lie at an altitude of 1,300–2,000 m above the main sea level. The collection was done in the months from August 2020 to October 2020 and June 2021 to October 2021. The collection of moths was done at night because moths are nocturnal species, using a light trap method. The samples were then sacrificed using a few drops of ethyl acetate in a killing jar. Afterward, the samples were pinned and stretched. A total of 300 samples (230 from Kullu and 70 from Mandi) were collected, which belong to 82 species, 67 genera, 20 subfamilies, and 14 families were collected and identified. From Kullu district, we collected 43 species, and from Mandi, we collected 13 species. Other than these, 26 species were found to be common in both Kullu and Mandi districts, making a total of 69 species from Kullu and 39 species from Mandi. The genitalia dissection of 54 moth’s samples was also performed. The most species-rich family was Erebidae, which includes 40 species, and the most abundant species during the study was Nyctemera adversata (Schaller, 1788). The moth’s population was found to be highest in the Kullu district, and the diversity of moths was highest in the months of July- September and declined from October onward.


Keyword:     Taxonomy Lepidoptera Moths Mandi Kullu Himachal Pradesh


Citation:

Thakur N, Bhardwaj V, Kumari P, Sidhu AK. An inventory of moths (Lepidoptera: Heterocera) from Kullu and Mandi districts of Himachal Pradesh. J App Biol Biotech. 2024. Online First. http://doi.org/10.7324/JABB.2024.175339

Copyright: Author(s). This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license.

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